Carolyn Boroden

About Carolyn Boroden

After quitting high school and running away from home, Carolyn Boroden took the “non-traditional road” to Wall Street. She found a job as a secretary/gopher to the GOVT Bond Trading Room and Donaldson, Lufkin and Jenrette.Fast-forward a few years after the crash of ‘87 when Carolyn found her mentor, Robert Miner and learned of his work with Fibonacci. After that, as they say, “the rest is history.”

Her book, Fibonacci Trading: How to Master the Time and Price Advantage,was published by McGraw-Hill in early 2008. She currently produces a video newsletter for her subscribers on stocks and ETF’s that are featured on her website ( and participates in a live, daily trading chat room at Simpler Trading. Boroden’s work is also featured on Over the last year Carolyn’s analysis has been showcased multiple times by Jim Cramer, on his show, “Mad Money.”

Specialties: 25 years Commodity Trading Advisor & Technical Analysis

  • Simpler Sentiment - Weekly Wrap Up 10/21/16

    Simpler Sentiment - Weekly Wrap Up 10/21/16

    The VIX has fallen considerably on the week, pushing down from a high around 17 on Monday to 13.33 now, its lowest in two weeks. The VXST, the 9 day Voalitlity Index, is all the way down at 10.65, on pace for its lowest since September 7. The VIX closely follows the actual volatility of the SPX, which is down below 9 percent.
  • Lessons From The Day After the Crash of 87

    Lessons From The Day After the Crash of 87

    So the story goes, my good friend Rick C. a cash bond trader in New York calls me the night of October 19th and tells me to get to work early Tuesday morning. They sold stocks and bought bonds in the final hour of trade. The bond futures will be locked limit in Chicago and all the shorts will have to come to LIFFE to get out.
  • The Role Of Psychology In Trading

    The Role Of Psychology In Trading

    According to Dr. Tharp, the psychological outlook and an individual’s way of thinking towards trading is the most important factor for success. The fact that the actual trading strategy is ranked the least important by Dr. Tharp, suggests that regardless of how successful a strategy is, psychology is the key to being successful.