Bruce Marshall

About Bruce Marshall

Bruce began his career working for a Wall Street firm on a bond desk after the Crash of ’87. He spent several years trading bonds until he switched to the equity side which developed his love of trading equities and options early on. He traded IPO’s, secondaries, and preferred’s. In the early days, he actually had to hand write “tickets” to buy and sell securities.

Over the years, he has worked for several Wall Street firms managing institutional money as well as retail accounts. Bruce developed skills for options and the Income-style trading as a result of continuously trading through the Gulf War, the bubble, 911, the Economic Crisis of 2008, the Flash Crash, as well as many other milestones. Bruce’s passion for teaching led him to be a mentor and coach to many fellow financial consultants.

Trade Experience: 27 Years Professional and Retail Trading

Specialties: Equities, Options, Greeks, and Risk Management

  • Simpler Sentiment - Weekly Wrap Up 10/21/16

    Simpler Sentiment - Weekly Wrap Up 10/21/16

    The VIX has fallen considerably on the week, pushing down from a high around 17 on Monday to 13.33 now, its lowest in two weeks. The VXST, the 9 day Voalitlity Index, is all the way down at 10.65, on pace for its lowest since September 7. The VIX closely follows the actual volatility of the SPX, which is down below 9 percent.
  • Lessons From The Day After the Crash of 87

    Lessons From The Day After the Crash of 87

    So the story goes, my good friend Rick C. a cash bond trader in New York calls me the night of October 19th and tells me to get to work early Tuesday morning. They sold stocks and bought bonds in the final hour of trade. The bond futures will be locked limit in Chicago and all the shorts will have to come to LIFFE to get out.
  • The Role Of Psychology In Trading

    The Role Of Psychology In Trading

    According to Dr. Tharp, the psychological outlook and an individual’s way of thinking towards trading is the most important factor for success. The fact that the actual trading strategy is ranked the least important by Dr. Tharp, suggests that regardless of how successful a strategy is, psychology is the key to being successful.